Tag Archives: sun

Partial solar eclipse from Sydney

Today, 10th May 2013, the combined movements of the Sun, Earth and Moon gave us a very nice Annular Solar Eclipse. Following a similar path to the Total Solar Eclipse we enjoyed last November, the shadow of the Moon over the Earth moved from North Australia to the Pacific. However, today the Moon was close to its maximum distance to the Earth (planets and satellites move following elliptical orbits) and hence its apparent size on the sky was not big enough to completely cover the disc of the Sun. This is indeed the reason the eclipse was an annular solar eclipse.

In this occasion I couldn’t travel to North Australia to enjoy the annular eclipse (actually, I have seen 2 of these in the past, the most recent one was on 3rd October 2005 from Madrid), and even last night I didn’t expect to do anything special about this today. But this morning, while watching it from my backyard using my solar glasses, I decided just to take some few shots using not the telescope but only the tele lens. This is the result:

Partial Solar Eclipse from Sydney. Data obtained using a CANON EOS 600D, a 250mm Tele Lens and a Solar filter (which I hold by hand). I stacked 12 individual frames obtained at ISO 100, f10, 1/80 s using the Lynkeos software. The final processing was achieved using Photoshop. 10 May 2013 @ 09: 10 AEST ( 00:10 UT ), Sydney, Australia.
Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía)

I hope you like it.

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Timelapse of the Total Solar Eclipse

Last week I shared some of the images I obtained during the Total Solar Eclipse on 13 / 14 November 2012. It was observed from the Mulligan Highway, 44 km south of Lakeland, Queensland Australia. After spending a weekend playing with the raw frames, I ended up with this timelapse video, which shows all the sequence of the eclipse.

Timelapse video of the Total Solar Eclipse on 13 / 14 Nov 2012. The direct link to YouTube is here. Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía).

The video combines 1203 individual frames obtained while the eclipse was happening. As before, I used my refractor Skywatcher telescope, 80 mm aperture and 600 mm focal, and my digital camera CANON EOS 600D at primary focus. For all partial phases but the totality I used a solar filter which blocks the 99.9997% of the incident light. The approximate field of view of the video is 2ºx1º. I usually took a frame each 6 seconds, but sometimes I triggered many consecutive images to improve the quality of the final photo of that moment. The music is the theme “WorldBuilder” written by Fran Solo and included in Epic Soul Factory Xpansion Edition.

Total Solar Eclipse 13 / 14 Nov 2012

After many years waiting for it, I have finally observed (and enjoyed!) my very first Total Solar Eclipse. It was on 14 November 2012 (still 13 November following time in UT) and I was 45 km south of Lakeland, Queensland Australia (I had to drive during the night trying to escape from the clouds in the coast near Port Douglas). Here you have some of the images I have obtained of this rare phenomenon.

My sequence of the Total Solar Eclipse on 13 / 14 November 2012, 50 km south from Lakeland, Queensland, Australia. I used a Skywatcher D 80mm, F 600mm, primary focus using CANON EOS 600D. All times given in UT and correspond to 13 Nov 2012. Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía).

Some more pictures:

The sun rises, but the eclipse did already start. Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía).

Image of the totality showing the brightest areas of the solar corona and some solar prominences close to the lunar limb (in red). Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía).

Image of the totality showing the diffuse solar corona, but the brightest areas are overexposed. Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía).

Diamond ring, the first light of the Sun coming after the totality. Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía).

HDR (High Dynamic Range) image combining 20 individual frames with different exposition times. Credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez (Australian Astronomical Observatory / Macquarie University, Agrupación Astronómica de Córdoba / Red Andaluza de Astronomía).